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Coast to Coast for the FFB: ALL OUR BIKES!


JEFF'S BIKES:


I have always enjoyed riding bikes, talking about bikes, tinkering with bikes, shopping for bikes that I can't afford (and will never buy), and pretty much anything to do with bikes. So, I made this page more for myself rather than anything else. But, the real truth is, a blizzard has kept us from flying back to California for the Holidays, so this is just something to do in the meantime. So, now that I have shoveled snow to death, weighed our bikes, and put together a fixed gear bike (see below), I now bring you a list of all bikes in chronological order of their arrival into our lives. Stupid snow. By the way, AK and I now collectively own 11 bikes. Awesome!



1994 Specialized Stumpjumper M2:

This bike was a result of several summers of manual labor in high school, and since then, I've ridden the bike very hard. Other than the frame, the only original components are the seat post, the brakes, the brake levers, and the shifters. Everything else has been replaced, including the original ridgid fork. As of now, the bike is destined to become a single speed as the shifters are so worn that they almost never shift.





2001 Schwinn Cruiser SS:

The greatest bike ever. The beach cruiser is such a classic, that it is one of my favorites. It is such a stable ride that I prefer it when the winter conditions in Boulder bring out the snow and ice. Plus with the big fenders, it's perfect for the slushy road conditions. Luckily, I purchased this bike before Schwinn completely tanked and was bought out by Pacific Cycles (prior to Pacific unleashing a fleet of low quality Schwinns on the unknowing public in stores like Walmart). Note the bent fender strut on the rear wheel. That is, among other scrapes, the result of a nasty "chain tossing" wipe out.





2001 Butterworth Custom Recumbent:

I built this bike myself and let me tell you, it shows! It's a tank! I don't know for sure, but I think it weighs about 50 pounds. I cut the main frame from 2x2" cromo box tubing. I went with the box tubing because I figured it would be easier to align the frame when it came time to weld it up. Well, that was true, but as a result I had to settle on a very thick walled tubing. That made it weigh as much as a school bus, hence the color. Put this bike on the list of "bikes I don't want to be run over by". It actually has a rear suspension that I took off the back of a 1994 Specialized FSR. I just had to match the pivot points by welding joints to my frame and I was good to go. If anyone wants the front half of a 1994 Specialized FSR, let me know. I currently let my mother "take care of" the bike in California. I'd like to get it back here because it sure is fun to ride.





2002 Specialized Allez A1 Elite:

I sort of "accidentally" purchased this bike on eBay. By that, I mean I put a bid in on eBay fully expecting to be out bid. That never happened. Anyway, so now I have the "Lemon Yellow" "Banana" bike. It rides well, but I've never really liked the frame at all. Plus, I'm not jazzed on the carbon fork. If I had 500 bucks laying around, I'd take all the parts off of this frame and put them on The Surly Pacer. "Steel is real," or that's what they say. They say a lot, don't they?





2005 Surly Long Haul Trucker:

My trusty touring bike was built by Xavier Schwartz at Quality Bicycle Sales & Service (3952 Clairemont Mesa Blvd # B, San Diego, CA 92117, (858) 270-2412). Xavier has done a lot of touring and he runs a great local shop. He helped me piece this bike together from the ground up. Picking out all the parts was fun, but I had to be careful not to get too carried away. The result was awesome! I love this bike; the ride is sweet (super smooth and stable) and it looks cool too. I really like the old-school style lugs on the fork (check the Surly link).





2006 Bike Friday New World Tourist:

I dig this "clown bike". It's a folder that can pack into a regular everyday Samsonite suitcase. It is a blast to ride and is certainly an eye catcher. Great for touring as you can fly just about any where and avoid the additional costs airlines like to charge for bicycles. If you are interested in one, contact Walter at Bike Friday (walterl@bikefriday.com) and tell him I sent you!





1975 "His" Scwhinn Le Tour:

These were the best craigslits scores ever! I bought these "His and Hers" bikes off of a retired guy in Arvada, CO for 100 bucks (total). He bought them for him and his wife back in 1975 and almost never rode them. It sure shows too; they are in great shape and there is no rust on them at all. The only non-original parts on them are the tires (I bought them with with rotted original tires and tubes), the saddle on the "mixte" and the bar tape on the mens bike. Classy! Interestingly enough, the majority of the components have a Schwinn label on them (even the hubs, derailers, and brake levers). Here is a link with some more information on them including original ads and manuals (this is also a great place to get all sorts of information about pre-1980 Schwinns).





1983 Raleigh Olympian Fixed Gear:

I bought this clunker on the cheap off of craigslist from some creepy dude. If you google "Raleigh Olympian", you will discover that this bike was not held in the highest regard. The frame is lugged cromo though, so I was comfortable with stripping the parts and making it into my first fixed gear bike. So, off went the old Suntour shifters and derailers. I ditched the original saddle. Spun off the freewheel cogs, and spun on a track cog. I kept both brakes as there is no lockring on the track cog (no room on the hub), but I did ditch the old suicide levers. The chainline seems OK, so I will not need to redish the rear wheel. I also fliped and chopped the original drop bars for the "bull-horn" look. This bike and this webpage are brought to you by the time I have while I wait fot this blizzard to subside. If I end up liking this bike as much as I think I will, I plan to build up a new rear wheel for it with a propper track hub.





BIKES JEFF USED TO OWN:


2000 Mountain Cycle BMX:

Mountain Cycle used to be located in San Luis Obispo, CA. I picked this frame up from them on a the cheap at one of their "yard sales". It took me about a year to build up before it was rideable. It was a cool bike, but I almost never rode it. So, I sold it for a song on eBay. Bummer. My "quiver" will now never be complete without a BMX.







AK'S BIKES:


Since AK is marrying me, she has learned to accept that bikes are a way of life. As a result, her collection is slowly growing. Something tells me she is not working to have as many as I have, but only time will tell!



2002 Cannondale F300:

This was AK's first bike in the "Era of Jeff". It's a basic entry level mountain bike. As usual with Cannondales, the frame is very nice, but the components leave a lot to be desired. Either way, AK is not too interested in riding trails, so this bike doesn't get riden often. It is currently in storage. As a result, I don't have much information on this one.






2004 Cannondale T2000:

Written by AK: This is my first non-mountain bike! I am finally feeling the benefits of a bike designed specifically for the road - prior to this I was riding a mountain bike with slicks. This Cannondale was recommended in several cross-country journals that I read while researching the various routes to take across the country. I do recommend having a bike fitting done to be sure your saddle, shifters, stem and bars are in the correct position for your body. I added shims to my shifters so the reach wasn't quite as far for my hands (they do make women's shifters but swapping them out was going to be a bit too pricey).



1975 "Hers" Scwhinn Le Tour:

These were the best craigslits scores ever! I bought these "His and Hers" bikes off of a retired guy in Arvada, CO for 100 bucks (total). He bought them for him and his wife back in 1975 and almost never rode them. It sure shows too; they are in great shape and there is no rust on them at all. The only non-original parts on them are the tires (I bought them with with rotted original tires and tubes), the saddle on the "mixte" and the bar tape on the mens bike. Classy! Interestingly enough, the majority of the components have a Schwinn label on them (even the hubs, derailers, and brake levers). Here is a link with some more information on them including original ads and manuals (this is also a great place to get all sorts of information about pre-1980 Schwinns).








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